Discover the Crypt

History
Today at the Cathedral View More
Stations of water - installation
8:00am Holy Communion
10:15am Choral Mattins
11:30am Sung Eucharist
3:15pm Reformation Choral Evensong: Queen Mary
4:45pm Sunday Organ Recital - Simon Hogan
6:00pm Eucharist

Discover the Crypt

Nelson's tomb Nelson's Tomb
Lord Nelson was famously killed in the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 and buried in St Paul's after a state funeral. He was laid in a coffin made from the timber of a French ship he defeated in battle. The black marble sarcophagus that adorns his tomb was originally made for Cardinal Wolsey, Lord Chancellor during the reign of Henry VIII in the early sixteenth century. After Wolsey's fall from favour, it remained unused at Windsor until a suitable recipient could be found. Nelson's viscount coronet now tops this handsome monument. 
 
Wellington's tomb Wellington's Tomb
Wellington rests in a simple but imposing casket made of Cornish granite. Although a national hero, Wellington was not a man of glory in his victories. The Duke was known as The Iron Duke and as a result of his tireless campaigning, has left a colourful list of namesakes - Wellington boots, the dish Beef Wellington and even a brand of cigars. He also coined some memorable phrases. He gave the expression ' . . . and another thing' to the English language and declared 'The battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton.' The banners hanging around Wellington's tomb were made for his funeral procession. 
 
Wren's tomb Sir Christopher Wren's Tomb
Sir Christopher Wren, the architect of St Paul's, is buried in the south aisle at the east end of the crypt. His tomb is marked by a simple stone and is surrounded by memorials to his family, to Robert Hooke and to the masons and other colleagues. The Latin epitaph above his tomb, famously addresses us: 'Reader, if you seek his monument, look around you.' In the same section of the crypt are many tombs and memorials of artists, scientists and musicians. They include the painter Sir Joshua Reynolds; the scientist Alexander Fleming, who discovered penicillin; the composer Arthur Sullivan; and the sculptor Henry Moore.