Latest News
Today at the Cathedral View More
7:30am Morning Prayer
8:00am Eucharist
8:30am Doors open for sightseeing
12:30pm Eucharist
3:30pm Last entry for sightseeing
4:00pm Evening Prayer

Battle of the Atlantic remembered at St Paul's, 70 years on

Veterans from the Merchant and Royal Navies have gathered at St Paul's for a service to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic.

The special Evensong service on Wednesday, 8 May, saw holders of the Atlantic Star, joined by other veterans and current members of armed forces from across the world to remember the campaign which Sir Winston Churchill described as the only thing which 'really frightened' him during WWII.

WATCH THE BBC1 NEWS AT 10 REPORT OF THE SERVICE

Giving the Bidding at the service, The Right Reverend Michael Colclough, Canon Paster of St Paul's, said: "We commend to God the thousands of personnel, from both the Royal and Merchant Navies and the Royal Air Force, who sacrifices their lives to provide for and protect this nation. We pray for the repose of the souls of those who died and we remember, too, those whose lives were changed forever through the injury and trauma they suffered during this Battle."

VIEW IMAGES FROM THE SERVICE AND MARCH-PAST

The second lesson, from the Gospel of Mark, was read by Admiral Sir George Zambellas KCB DSC ADC, First Sea Lord and Chief of he Naval Staff, and the address was given by the Right Reverend Stephen Venner, Bishop to the Forces.

Hymns included Eternal Monarch, King most high and Eternal Father, strong to save, the chorus to which reads 'O hear us when we cry to thee, for those in peril on the sea'.

READ THE FULL ORDER OF SERVICE

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest military campaign of the Second World War. Running from 1939-1945, at its height the campaign saw German ships, aircraft and U-boats pitted against naval vessels from various allied countries and merchant fleets, transferring supplies across the Atlantic.

During the six-year battle, 5,000 merchant ships were sunk with more than 30,000 merchant seamen killed. Another 30,000 sailors and airmen were also killed in their attempts to protect the convoys.

The anniversary service, which was attended by the Lord Mayor of London, finished with a march-past of the Cathedral by serving sailors from ships including HMS Illustrious and HMS Edinburgh.